a gene conserved and unique to T cells

Guy Hermans Guy.Hermans at ablynx.com
Wed Jan 30 03:28:08 EST 2008


Hi Li,

I'd recommend another T-cell marker (say some CD3 component, or CD4/CD8
if you want to differentiate subtypes).

Back in the day I worked in a lab which did a lot of CDR lenght
spectratyping ("immunoscope") within various V region subgroups of the
same clinical sample cDNA (looking for clonal expansion). I recall
suggesting they use the non-variable part of the TCR to quantitate the
distribution of the various V gene subgroups versus the total T-cell
group (as the spectra show clonal expansion within V gene groups, but
the technique cannot compare abundance across several V gene groups),
but I cannot remember if there was a technical problem (such as degree
of conservation, conserved region lenght etc) or if they just decided to
stick with something that worked well enough for them.

Guy

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Guy Hermans, PhD
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-----Original Message-----
From: chen li [mailto:chen_li3 at yahoo.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, January 29, 2008 00:03
To: cyto-inbox
Subject: a gene conserved and unique to T cells

Hi all,

Sorry this is a Flow question.

I want to quantify the T cell number within PBMCs background based on
genomic DNA. Is it possible to find a gene/fragment which is conserved
in all the naive/mature T cells and also unique to T cells,  but not in
other cells based on TCR rearrangement( or other theory) ?

Thank you in advance,

Li




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