96 well plates

Gerstein, Rachel Rachel.Gerstein at umassmed.edu
Thu Jan 4 14:14:42 EST 2007


you can use your thumb to rub the bottom of the well to resuspend the cells after spinning (we have adaptors to hold the plates, with a rubber cushion to support the plate). also, since the plates are thin, the cells stay cold on ice.

=======================================================
Rachel M. Gerstein, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Graduate Program in Immunology/Virology
University of Massachusetts Medical School
55 Lake Avenue North
Worcester, MA 01655-0002
(508) 856-1044
(508) 856-5920 (FAX)


> ----------
> From: 	Laura Corral
> Sent: 	Thursday, January 4, 2007 1:26 PM
> To:	Gerstein, Rachel
> Subject:	RE: 96 well plates
> 
> Hi, 
> can I ask you why do you use flexible plates? 
> thanks
> Laura
> 
>   _____  
> 
> From: Gerstein, Rachel [mailto:Rachel.Gerstein at umassmed.edu] 
> Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2007 2:42 PM
> To: Cytometry Mailing List
> Subject: RE: 96 well plates
> 
> 
> 
> hi 
> 
> yes we (and probably many others) use 96 well plate [353911 Falcon U-bottom flexible plates].  We place the reagent mix into the well (30-150 ul) and then 30 ul of cells (1.8 million).  Our reagents are titrated to function optimally at this cell concentration.
> 
> hope this helps, 
> regards, 
> Rachel 
> 
> ======================================================= 
> Rachel M. Gerstein, Ph.D. 
> Associate Professor 
> Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology 
> Graduate Program in Immunology/Virology 
> University of Massachusetts Medical School 
> 55 Lake Avenue North 
> Worcester, MA 01655-0002 
> (508) 856-1044 
> (508) 856-5920 (FAX) 
> 
> 
>	---------- 
> From:   Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice (NIH/NCI) [E] 
> Sent:   Tuesday, January 2, 2007 12:43 PM 
> To:	  Cytometry Mailing List 
> Subject:	  96 well plates 
> 
>	We are investigating the use of 96 well plates for patient specimens. We are understaffed for our specimen load and this would reduce the amount of work per case. Our problem is that all patients have had their diagnostic biopsy elsewhere and most have also had therapy of some sort. We do minimal residual disease on just about all cases, acquiring 200,000- 750,000 events routinely. We therefore need to stain at least 1 million cells per antibody combo. Has anyone done this in 96 well plates?
> 
> 	
> 
>	Maryalice Stetler-Stevenson, Ph.D., M.D. 
> 
>	Chief, Flow Cytometry Unit, LP, NCI, NIH 
> 
> 	
> 
> 
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